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MOLE/ LESION REMOVAL

What is it?

A mole (nevus) is a non-cancerous (benign) skin lesion that is made up of the color-producing (pigment-producing) cells of the skin (melanocytes). A mole that is present at birth is referred to as a congenital nevus. A dysplastic nevus (discussed elsewhere) is a mole in which unusual (atypical) growth is noted. Moles (nevi, the plural of nevus) slowly enlarge evenly in all directions. After moles stop growing (stabilize), they may persist or they may become smaller (regress) later in life. Sun exposure and family tendency (heredity) play a role in the development of moles. Moles may sometimes become warm or red in color (inflamed) or irritated by friction from rubbing or contact with rough clothing or by other types of injury.

Symptoms

Atopic dermatitis (eczema) signs and symptoms vary widely from person to person and include:

  • Dry skin

  • Itching, which may be severe, especially at night

  • Red to brownish-gray patches, especially on the hands, feet, ankles, wrists, neck, upper chest, eyelids, inside the bend of the elbows and knees, and in infants, the face and scalp

  • Small, raised bumps, which may leak fluid and crust over when scratched

  • Thickened, cracked, scaly skin

  • Raw, sensitive, swollen skin from scratching

Atopic dermatitis most often begins before age 5 and may persist into adolescence and adulthood. For some people, it flares periodically and then clears up for a time, even for several years.

Complications

  • Asthma and hay fever. Eczema sometimes precedes these conditions. More than half of young children with atopic dermatitis develop asthma and hay fever by age 13.

  • Chronic itchy, scaly skin. A skin condition called neurodermatitis (lichen simplex chronicus) starts with a patch of itchy skin. You scratch the area, which makes it even itchier. Eventually, you may scratch simply out of habit. This condition can cause the affected skin to become discolored, thick and leathery.

  • Skin infections. Repeated scratching that breaks the skin can cause open sores and cracks. These increase the risk of infection from bacteria and viruses, including the herpes simplex virus.

  • Irritant hand dermatitis. This especially affects people whose work requires that their hands are often wet and exposed to harsh soaps, detergents and disinfectants.

  • Allergic contact dermatitis. This condition is common in people with atopic dermatitis.

  • Sleep problems. The itch-scratch cycle can cause poor sleep qu

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Biopsia de piel